Why You Should Consider Living In A Tent

Recently I found myself wondering and talking about some of the quirky and brilliant ways people from around the world use tents. Consequently I pondered about the possibility that some people have contemplated or even opted for living in a tent permanently. Inspired by this idea, I dug a bit further into this topic of permanent tented accommodation.

What would living in a tent full time entail? Some individuals might be unnerved by this idea, while others might be thrilled and excited to take on the challenge and some may have no alternative. Whatever the reason or justification – there are 5 indisputable and great benefits of moving from your modern home to kicking it in a tent.

1. The cost effectiveness is clear

Finding the right location to pitch your tent will definitely decrease your monthly cost of rent, electricity and the like. The idea of saving on your expenses in this matter might seem slightly extreme, but compare it to running a modern household and you may just change your mind. Naturally, you might be concerned about cold winters, no internet and not having warm showers, but there are ways to avoid that. You could invest in a proper tent and enough winter provisions, sign-up at a gym that has shower amenities and use the free internet offered by libraries, coffee-shops and even shopping malls.

2. It will be an invigorating challenge and a noteworthy experience

Having a luxury, purpose-designed, tent will definitely make the experience more comfortable and less effortful, but it will still be a demanding challenge to live in a tent full time. There is, however, a multitude of people who find pleasure, excitement and gratification from such difficult tasks and many people thrive in it! Facing and conquering a challenge like this will without a doubt be tremendously rewarding and enriching. It will not only emancipate you and boost your self-respect and dignity, but it will also offer you a sense of accomplishment being able to live and take care of yourself like our ancestors, before modernism.

3. It will significantly reduce your Eco Footprint

We are all becoming increasingly aware of the importance of reducing and the impact of our Eco Footprint. This starts with being more conscious of leaving less of a negative ecological footprint on Earth and ensuring it is as small as possible. Comparing the running a modern household to living in a tent – it is clear that a tent leaves an immensely small Eco Footprint. If you are already concerned about Earth’s future and reducing the impact you have on Mother Nature – you are most likely thoroughly ready and able to live in a tent permanently.

4. It will allow you to experience forest bathing

Although the thought of submerging yourself in the open waters hidden within forests is enchanting – forest bathing actually refers to spending time amongst trees and is an established way of increasing you happiness and health. Japanese studies have uncovered that the phytoncides released by plants aid in regulating your body, improve the immune system and increases air intake – which leads to happiness and increased health.

5. It offers you a less complicated way of life

Modern life is often characterised by a constant rush and a milieu of complication. Life in a tent forces you to pay attention to the things that are truly important. Tent-living is a way of life that is simpler and more focused on what really matters, as well as a shift in true perspective. Due to few people having experienced a genuine simple life – living in a tent will very much be life changing and meaningful moment.

While researching this article I happened upon an astonishing variety of, what is coined as, glamping tents. Some companies put a double bed and a carpet inside and call it glamping and then others deliver tent structures with flooring, proper windows and doors, bathroom amenities and beautifully decorated interiors.

The Life of Mammogram Inventor Stafford L Warren

Stafford L. Warren was one of the most significant contributors to radiology during his lifetime. He not only was the first doctor to perform a mammogram, but was also had a hand in turning UCLA into one of the most prestigious medical universities in the country, was a special assistant on mental disabilities to Presidents John F Kennedy and Lyndon B Johnson, and aided the U.S. government in testing of nuclear weapons before speaking out about the dangers of nuclear fallout from weapons testing, which were controversial at the time. However, his strong opinions would eventually be considered, leading up to the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty in 1963.

Born in New Mexico in 1896, Stafford L. Warren attended the University of California, Berkeley, and graduated with his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1918. Heading to the University of California, San Francisco, he graduated with his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1922 and later did post-doctoral work at John Hopkins School of Medicine and Harvard University.

Warren became an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1926. Since the Department of Radiology was brand new at the time, Warren was one of the original group of medical professionals that Dean George Whipple chose to staff the school. By 1930, Warren was an Associate Professor of Medicine. He began to study the work of Albert Salomon, a sociologist from the University of Berlin who produced over 3,000 images of mastectomy specimens and extensively studied the many forms and stages of cancer in the breast. Since Salomon wasn’t keen to recognize the life saving aspects of his discoveries, Warren expanded on his research, using radiology to track changes in breast tissue and developing a stereoscopic technique in which the patient would lie on her side with one arm raised while being X-Rayed. This was a huge breakthrough for breast cancer detection, as it allowed diagnosis of breast cancer to be possible without surgery. Warren subsequently published “A Roentgenologic Study of the Breast” in 1930. Today Warren is cited as the inventor of the mammogram for his breast imaging technique. Each year mammograms are responsible to diagnosing millions of breast cancer cases, effectively saving the lives of women the world over.

Warren, having now tackled a major milestone in his career and developing a new life saving technique, then went on to take on a new project: overseeing the health and safety of thousands during the Manhattan Project. His new role meant being responsible for the safety aspects of the detonation of the Trinity nuclear test in Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 16, 1945. He later handled radiological safety when he led a team of surveyors to Japan, and to the Bikini Atoll in 1946, where more nuclear testing was done. Warren was in charge of assessing the radioactive contamination of the environment and atmosphere, which he was appalled by.

In response to this, in a piece for LIFE magazine in 1947 he wrote, “The development of atomic bombs has presented the world with a variety of formidable scientific, moral and political problems, nearly all of them still unsolved.” He went on to write an in depth analysis of the effects of the bombs, people and environment affected, the time length in which the effects of the bomb lasted, safety measures used during the Bikini expedition in which “a month passed before men could stay on some of the ships for more than an hour”, and “300 men of the safety section lived and worked in the contaminated area to protect some 42,000 other members of the Bikini expedition. Every group which entered the target area was accompanied by a safety monitor who determined how long it could stay.” The men were then bathed carefully when they returned, and if their Geiger counters indicated radioactive contamination they had to be bathed again. “Occasionally when a man had taken off his protective gloves in the ‘hot’ area, the safety section had to dissolve the outer layer of skin from their hands with acid.” Clothes and other materials found too contaminated were sunk into the ocean a mile below the surface, because there was literally “no other way to keep them permanently away from human beings.”

In the article, Warren concluded that atomic weapons can never be prepared for by anyone involved, and that “no defense would have been effective. The only defense against atomic bombs still lies outside the scope of science. It is the prevention of atomic war.”

Warren left his position in 1946, becoming the Chief of the Medical Section of the Atomic Energy Commission, which is a civilian agency that succeeded the Manhattan Project; and later he was awarded the Army Distinguished Service Medal and the Legion of Merit for his contributions to radioactive and atomic weapons safety.

In 1947, Warren was once again at the helm of a brand new medical university, this time UCLA, which had been voted on to establish a medical school for Southern California. He was appointed as the school’s first dean. In 1951 the first students, 28 in total, were enrolled, and there were 15 faculty members. By 1955, when the class graduated, there were 43 faculty members. The UCLA Medical Center officially opened in 1955, and Warren oversaw many milestones and achievements while there, including the addition of schools for Dentistry, Nursing, and Public Health.